Introduce the Ponce Art Museum in Chicago to a comprehensive selection of its collection

chicago- The first of two days of the Engage 2022 seminar and workshop series has concluded, creating the Billy Ocasiovisionary CEO of National Museum of Puerto Rican Art and Culturegave the occasion for the first opening of the exhibition “Nostalgia for My Island: Puerto Rican Painting from the Museo de Arte de Ponce (1786-1962)”.

As a preamble, Iraida Rodríguez-Negron, art historian of Ponce Art Museum and curator of the exhibition expressed this Wednesday: “We knew we wanted to bring pieces from Campeche and Oller from the museum’s collection for this very special occasion, and at the same time we wanted the selected works to have a special meaning, to be in tune with the diaspora, so we we also focus on works from the first half of the 20th century, because of the way artists reflected the period of change of power on the island, from Spain to the United States, and focused on three themes: my people, my customs and my home through its landscapes.

“We see these works differently when they are exhibited in other spaces.

This is a treasure that we share and we know that it will move, it will touch the fibers of the heart, because in some way they will be reflected in them, ”concluded Cheryl Hartup.

The exhibition titled will open to the public on September 20 and will remain available for public use at the aforementioned museum until June 9, 2023.

This is a selection of 21 paintings commissioned by Ponce Art Museum curator Iraida Rodríguez-Negron that represents the work of some of the most important Puerto Rican knitters from the period of the 18th century to the first half of the 20th century., with parts of figures the size of Jose Campeche, Francisco Oller, Miguel Pou and Myrna Baezgreat names in island painting whose pictorial heritage is internationally recognized.

The exhibition will be complemented by a catalogue, which will include images of all the works, as well as an academic essay by the curator, which will serve to add context to the exhibition.

On September 14, 2022, the National Museum of Puerto Rican Art and Culture hosted the opening of the exhibition Nostalgia for My Island: Puerto Rican Painting from the Museo de Arte de Ponce (1786-1962). (Elias Carmona)

It is worth mentioning that according to Rodríguez-Negron, the exhibition’s curation revolves around three recurring concepts in the plastic arts of the period represented in it, which can be defined or identified as: my island, my people and my home. These are precisely the topics that also evoke the sense of nostalgia of the Puerto Rican diaspora for the land they left. At the same time, these are concepts essential to identity development for a new generation of Puerto Ricans born in the United States.

The exhibit is divided into three themes: From My Home in the Country to My Home in the City, My People: Identity and Traditions, and My Island: The Magnificence of Puerto Rican Nature.

The first theme is expressed through the works: “Barrio Tokio”, 1962, by Myrna Baez; “Landscape with Bohio”, 1921, by Fernando Díaz Mackenna; The Door of San Juan, 1926, by Fernando Diaz Mackenna; “View from my studio, Salud 58, Ponce,” 1930-35, by Miguel Pou y Becerra; and “El Ranchón,” 1954, by Felix Rodríguez Baez. Yauko’s House, 1956-57, by Carlos Marichal.

The second theme is represented by works: “La parranda”, 1941, by Rafael Ríos Rey; The Family of Ño Gervasio, 1961, by Jose R. Oliver; “Las lavanderas”, 1898, by Miguel Pou y Becerra; The Vision of San Felipe Benicio, 1786, by José Campeche y Jordan; “Doña María Catalina de Urrutia”, 1788, by José Campeche y Jordan; Caracolillo, 1948, by Ramon Frade y Leon; The Empty Basket, 1931, by Oscar Colon Delgado; and The Promise, 1928, by Miguel Pugh and Becerra.

The second theme is expressed through the works: “Barrio Tokio”, 1962, by Myrna Baez; “Landscape with Bohio”, 1921, by Fernando Díaz Mackenna; The Door of San Juan, 1926, by Fernando Diaz Mackenna; “View from my studio, Salud 58, Ponce,” 1930-35, by Miguel Pou y Becerra; and “El Ranchón,” 1954, by Felix Rodríguez Baez. Yauko’s House, 1956-57, by Carlos Marichal.

The third theme is represented by works: “Paisaje de Barranquitas #7″, 1949, by Miguel Pou y Becerra; The Landscape of Jayuya, 1960, by Bartolome Maiol; The Entrance of Utuado, 1937, by Oscar Colon Delgado; Mountains, 1959, by Marilou Rodriguez Salas; “Landscape View of San German”, 1957, by Valdemar Morales; “Hacienda Aurora,” 1898, by Francisco Oller y Sestero; and Still Life, c. 1900, by Francisco Oller y Sestero.

This exhibition is sponsored by Bank of America and the Miranda Family Fund.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.