his love of The Beatles and his mockery of the Sex Pistols

He died Queen Elizabeth II and the memories of the British people bloom in a day charged with emotions.

With enough clarity to understand the new defining role that youth was beginning to play in history, Queen Elizabeth II saw at that time in rock culture the possibility of maintaining the illusion of closeness to people, and they were The Beatles those chosen to cement a tortuous alliance with the burgeoning movement that would know both reverence and shameless derision.

In addition to the Liverpool Four, Elton John, Rod Stewart, Mick Jagger, Robert Plant, Sting, Eric Clapton, Van Morrison, the Bee Gees, David Gilmour and Bono, among others, make up the long list of rock greats who kneel before the Queen Mother to receive the relevant Member of the Order of the British Empire medals.




Queen Elizabeth and the Beatles.

But the monarch also knew great rudeness along the way from some artists who remembered in a certain way, with their attitudes, the true spirit of rock and sporadically restored some of the lost trust.

In this great parable, The Beatles’ prize (a first for artists of this nature) happened on 26 October 1965 and the Silver Jubilee scandal when the The Sex Pistols invaded from a boat sailing down the Thames uttering the venomous verses against Isabel II from his song “God Save the Queen” in June 1977 appear as the two great extremes.

The Beatles with their decorations.  John Lennon would bring it back in 1969.


The Beatles with their decorations. John Lennon would bring it back in 1969.

However, before that tumultuous day in 1965 at Buckingham Palace, the Queen had already had her first taste of rock when, in November 1963, aware of the new phenomenon, featured the Beatles at the annual Royal Family variety show at London’s Prince of Wales Theatre.

But even that day His Majesty would have a sign that the relationship would not pass over calm terrain. It was when, in the midst of angering the audience and the monarch himself over the band’s performance, John Lennon fired off his mocking catchphrase before closing the set with ‘Twist & Shout’: ‘For the next number I want to ask you a favour. Those in the cheap seats can clap their hands; those in expensive places can rock their jewelryLoud applause rang out from Elizabeth II’s bejeweled hands after these words.

The Beatles fans outside the gates of Buckingham Palace on Decoration Day.


The Beatles fans outside the gates of Buckingham Palace on Decoration Day.

For the post-war recovery, the figure of the monarchy in Britain was essential because of its ability to unite nationalist sentiment; but passed that first stage; the emergence of a new youth profile, with tastes and behavior that distanced itself from those of the elderly, necessitated the development of some strategy to allow the maintenance of social control.

See also

THE DECORATED BEATLES

Yes the rock it was the channel for young people’s expression, that’s where the effort had to be concentrated, and The Beatles symbolized all of that. For this reason, the monarchy took a bolder step in 1965 when it installed the band on the same level as war heroes or prominent nobles by embellishing them and thereby giving, in a roundabout way, an official character to rock culture that deprived it of all danger.

As with his sardonic catchphrase, it would be Lennon himself who, in 1969, would once again bring the Queen under control when returned his badge protesting the British position on the US invasion of Vietnam.

The Sex Pistols, great enemies of the Queen, at the gates of Buckingham Palace.


The Sex Pistols, great enemies of the Queen, at the gates of Buckingham Palace.

By then, the youth pulse that had dominated most of the decade, based on the dance, color and fashion dictated by Carnaby Street (a situation that could be controlled and even taken advantage of by royalty), had moved to San Francisco in full swing of hippieism.

The wave of progressive rock in Britain in the first half of the 1970s, with its apolitical stance and lyrics that vacillated between fantasy or dream stories and epic narratives, made rock forget its rebellious philosophy, giving the monarchy a break without need any effort.

The Sex Pistols take a swing at the Queen.


The Sex Pistols take a swing at the Queen.

A good symbol of time in this sense can be the repeated end of the concerts of what in when the chords sounded “God Save the Queen”the patriotic song of the British Empire, which the band recorded to close their album “A Night at the Opera”, as Mercury walked around the stage with cape and crown.

But they were also years of economic recession and conservative policies that drove many young people out of the system and sowed hopelessness. It was the serpent’s egg for the emergence of punk movement, that he would focus much of his fury on the queen.

Freddie Mercury wearing a cape and crown when he sings


Freddie Mercury in cape and crown singing “God Save the Queen”.

The Sex Pistols, a leading punk rock band, with their tongue-in-cheek song against Sovereign and the caricature of her figure on the cover of their only album, Never Mind The Bollocks, brought rock back to where it came from.

But the production performed on the Thames, according to the situationism suggested by the movement, has no cues in time, and the punk fury displaces the focus of Queen or directly blurs it.

Queen Elizabeth greets Paul McCartney and, on his part, singer Annie Lennox.


Queen Elizabeth greets Paul McCartney and, on his part, singer Annie Lennox.

With rock in full coexistence with the establishment, things turned out differently for Isabel II, who again knew how to read the situation and decided to advance her policy of decorating popular figures.

Over the years, the rockers were happily lining up to receive their respective medals and Isabel II already knew that she also reigned for that caste.

GML

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.